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Out of the various ghastly Ohio urban legends, this one may be the strangest: A humanoid, 4-foot frog apparently hangs out on the sides of roads in Loveland at night, and it will stand up on its hind legs, wave a wand over its head, and shoot sparks to deter humans. In recent times, archaeologists have been chased away from the site by mysterious government officials.

The ghost of a logger who died in a grisly sawmill accident attacks cars and terrorizes teenagers. The smell of rotting flesh predicts a visit. The legends stuck, however. While it was obviously superstition, the legend persisted. A 7-foot-tall specter whose job it is to collect the souls of suicide victims stalks lonely, depressed adolescents. Texas urban legends about monsters like the chupacabra or sites like the Alamo are creepy, sure, but have you heard about the lesser-known legend of an evil woman who lures children with candy?

Candy left out on the windowsill is meant to lure children so a spectral woman can pull out their teeth, kidnap them, or stab them in the eyes.

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Anyone who takes petrified wood from the state park risks bad luck, job loss, sickness, and accidents. Park managers claim they get dozens of packages every year sending back chunks of wood from regretful thieves. Frugal Vermonters facing extreme winters have been said to freeze their elderly and thaw them in the spring.

Is this more scary or utilitarian? Or both? On Halloween many years ago, a bus of transferring asylum inmates crashed, with one of the inmates escaping. Eventually, he allegedly attacked humans, too, leaving bodies strung up over the bridge. While the legendary Bigfoot gets a great deal of attention in this state, you might not have heard of Caddy short for Cadborosaurus , the local sea monster hanging out in Cadboro Bay. Mothman might be the more popular mystery, but rural West Virginia is also home to mysterious dog-like creatures the size of a lion with white shaggy fur.

An ugly, stumpy critter with a spiked tale, the hodag features in Paul Bunyan stories and reportedly likes to eat bulldogs. Through thick mist, usually in February, a ship can be seen sailing the Platte River, its phantom crew frosted over. Stories like this might keep you up at night, not because of the fanciful urban myths about monsters and witches but because of the grains of haunting truth … Without further ado, here is our list of urban legends in every state!

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Alaska: Kushtaka Shape-shifting creatures that are a cross between an otter and a man, the Kushtaka make noises that mimic children and wives to lure fishermen, though they are sometimes helpful tricksters. Arizona: Slaughterhouse Canyon One day, a father failed to return to his cabin during the s gold rush, and his family starved. Arkansas: Dog Boy A werewolf-like ghost walks on all fours and haunts his childhood home.

California: The Dark Watchers Featureless dark silhouettes, often with brimmed hats or walking sticks, stare down travelers during twilight and dawn in the Santa Lucia Mountains. Colorado: Riverdale Road Riverdale Road is home to a host of legends: While traveling down the road during a full moon, one can see the hanging bodies of slaves on the trees. Connecticut: Annabelle the Demonic Doll The demonic doll in The Conjuring and Annabelle is inspired by a real-life Raggedy Ann doll supposedly inhabited by the spirit of a dead girl, which was given to two demonologists, Ed and Lorraine Warren, after some extremely malicious paranormal activity.

Hawaii: Nightmarchers The deadly ghosts of ancient Hawaiian warriors march over the waters, chanting and blowing conch shells; if you hear them, run! Illinois: Ghost Elephants A real-life train wreck of circus cars leading to troop deaths has popularized the legend that elephants had to be buried where they fell.

Indiana: The Green-Clawed Beast in the Ohio River With hairy arms, clawed hands, and green skin, this human-sized creature grabs unsuspecting women.

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Iowa: Villisca Axe Murder House Based on real events, this cold case features a whole family two parents, four children, and two house guests being bludgeoned to death in their sleep. Kansas: The Gateway to Hell One of the several gateways to hell in America, the stairs in an old demolished church open to the other side on Halloween and the spring equinox. Massachusetts: Pukwudgies Tiny gray tricksters resembling humanoid porcupines will supposedly lure people off cliffs or trap them in sand in the swampy regions of Massachusetts.

Michigan: The Nain Rouge Out of the various Michigan urban legends, this one seems both ridiculous and feasible. Minnesota: Wendigo This is one of the oldest legendary monsters, dating back to the folklore of Native Americans, who hunted these foot-tall shape-shifting creatures even into the early 20 th century. Missouri: Zombie Road Stories about strange deaths along the road as far back as Native American times and drownings in the nearby river made it a fun haunted spot for teenagers for decades, but many of them have perished in strange accidents, too.

Montana: The Phantom Hitchhiker of Black Horse Lake A Native American man with long black hair wearing an outdated, baggy jacket and jeans collides with cars, suddenly appearing on their windshield, only for him to vanish without a dent. Nebraska: Radioactive Hornets This is a recent urban legend: After the Fukushima nuclear disaster, the locals of Nebraska believed that mutant hornets from that area had grown to four times their normal size and were running rampant locally. Nevada: The Spiteful Mermaid of Pyramid Lake While Area 51 gets all the fame and glory for its supposed alien autopsies, fewer people know about the curse on Pyramid Lake, which happened after a Paiute man fell in love with a mermaid.

New York: Cropsey This escaped mental patient with a hook for a hand would snatch children in Staten Island, but the old legend became horrifyingly real when a killer named Andre Rand was caught in the s.

North Carolina: The Vampire Beast of Bladenboro Gruesome deaths in the s of mutilated livestock and dogs drained of blood led to reports of something vaguely feline and huge living near Bladenboro. Ohio: The Loveland Frog Out of the various ghastly Ohio urban legends, this one may be the strangest: A humanoid, 4-foot frog apparently hangs out on the sides of roads in Loveland at night, and it will stand up on its hind legs, wave a wand over its head, and shoot sparks to deter humans. Oregon: The Bandaged Man The ghost of a logger who died in a grisly sawmill accident attacks cars and terrorizes teenagers.

Texas: The Candy Lady Texas urban legends about monsters like the chupacabra or sites like the Alamo are creepy, sure, but have you heard about the lesser-known legend of an evil woman who lures children with candy? Utah: The Curse on Escalante Petrified Forest Anyone who takes petrified wood from the state park risks bad luck, job loss, sickness, and accidents.

Vermont: Deep-Frozen Folks Frugal Vermonters facing extreme winters have been said to freeze their elderly and thaw them in the spring. Virginia: The Bunny Man On Halloween many years ago, a bus of transferring asylum inmates crashed, with one of the inmates escaping. Washington: Caddy of Cadboro Bay While the legendary Bigfoot gets a great deal of attention in this state, you might not have heard of Caddy short for Cadborosaurus , the local sea monster hanging out in Cadboro Bay.

West Virginia: The White Things Mothman might be the more popular mystery, but rural West Virginia is also home to mysterious dog-like creatures the size of a lion with white shaggy fur. Wisconsin: The Rhinelander Hodag An ugly, stumpy critter with a spiked tale, the hodag features in Paul Bunyan stories and reportedly likes to eat bulldogs. Taking care of a home and family is a blessing that comes with many responsibilities including, and most importantly showing love, care and support. It can be overwhelming at times, but finding balance through efficient solutions can help.

Take time to get out of dodge. Can be a plane, train or automobile. This series focuses on good old road trips. Some are a couple miles down the road and some are across the country or across the ocean to the most fantastic scenery or landmarks you've ever seen. Included are how to prepare, fun on the road, and preparation along the way. Chat Live Now! Chat Cancel. The mysterious footprints went over and under fences, through fields and backyards, and across the rooftops of houses.

They were even reported in the large cities of Camden and Philadelphia.

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Panic immediately began to spread, and posses formed in more than one town. Schools closed or suffered low attendance throughout lower NJ and in Philadelphia. Mills in the Pine Barrens were forced to close when workers refused to leave their homes and travel through the woods to get to their jobs. Eyewitnesses spotted the beast in Camden and in Bristol, Pennsylvania, and in both cities police fired on it but did not manage to bring it down. A few days later it reappeared in Camden, attacking a late night meeting of a social club and then flying away.

Earlier that day it had appeared in Haddon Heights, terrorizing a trolley car full of passengers before flying away. Witnesses claimed that it looked like a large flying kangaroo. Another trolley car-full of people saw it in Burlington when it scurried across the tracks in front of their car. In West Collingswood it appeared on the roof of a house and was described as an ostrich-like creature. Firemen turned their hose upon it, but it attacked them and then flew away.

The entire week people reported that their livestock, particularly their chickens, were being slaughtered. This was most widespread in the towns of Bridgeton and Millville. The marauding misanthrope reappeared later in the week in Camden, where a local woman found the beast attempting to eat her dog.

She hit it with a broomstick and it flew away. While there has not since been another week to match the frequency, fervor, and intensity of the January rampage, numerous sightings of the Jersey Devil have continued to be reported to this day. The tale of the Devil has spread beyond the Pine Barrens and has been embraced by all of New Jersey, even to the point where it has been largely commercialized.

The Devil is portrayed in toys, on t-shirts, and is even the subject of his own feature film. There are still many, however, who believe that the Jersey Devil is a very real, very dangerous creature. There has been a constant stream of reports over the years of Devil encounters. Most often, people report finding strange, unidentifiable tracks in the sandy soil in desolate areas of the Pine Barrens. Some reports claim that they are the footprints of a strange bird.

Others say that they closely resemble hoofprints, although whatever it is walks on just two legs. He is most commonly described as having the body of a kangaroo, the head of a dog, the face of a horse, large leathery wings, antlers similar to those of a deer, a forked reptilian tail and intimidating claws. While some Jerseyans embrace their Devil as nothing more than a quaint figment of our collective imagination, a source of unification and pride, and a unique and important piece of NJ folk culture, others see it as a very real creature and a threat to their safety.

Still others who have sworn they did not believe in the existence of the Jersey Devil have had their minds changed after spending just one moonlit night in the Pine Barrens. There, where a ghostly mist drifts across the cedar swamps and the unearthly cry of some unseen creature can be heard piercing the stillness of the dark forest, few disbelievers can be found. Whether its deep in the Pine Barrens or deep in our collective unconscious, one thing is certain—the Devil still lurks in New Jersey, and most likely always will.

This has haunted me since it happened in I was a senior at what was then Glassboro State College. I had heard about the Jersey Devil when I came to South Jersey, but being from North Jersey a different world I thought I was far too sophisticated to believe in such humbuggery. At the time the road was flanked by orchards and farms.

There were few houses and there was hardly any development. I was completely sober and awake when I caught a glimpse of something in my rear-view mirror. Curious as to what it could have been, I slowed down to take a gander. It was dark out, but moon lit enough that I had no trouble at all discerning the upright figure of a creature crossing the road from one side to the other roughly twenty five feet behind my car.

So petrified was I that I slept the rest of the night in the car, unwilling to get out in the same darkness that had introduced me to the Jersey Devil.


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I spent a lot of time in the Pine Barrens when I was growing up in NJ, and had my share of strange experiences. When I was about 13, I went camping alone near Hampton furnace. I had a bow with me and went looking for a rabbit dinner about an hour before sundown. Something started following me back in the trees. It tailed me back to my camp and circled while I cooked my dinner. This kept up until about two hours after dark—and let me tell you, it was one dark night. I finally decided that my visitor had moved on and crawled into my tent. I got all set to jump out when this thing whatever it was started screaming!

After several blasts it just stopped. In the morning I could find no tracks in the pine needles. I was one of the fortunate students to go three times during my four-year career at CMCT.

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Every ten minutes or so I could hear deep beastly growls that to this very day give me the creeps. Every year it was the same. I went canoeing with a friend of mine when we came across a bag that had been torn open and gone through. Then I heard it, the cry that still haunts my dreams: part human, part beast, and full of anger, pregnant with pure hate. I nearly flipped the canoe! We left, leaving whatever it was out there behind—or so I thought. It seemed to follow us. Every time we stopped or paused, it got closer to the river. We pushed on. Then worse came to worst, as we tipped the canoe.

I heard the thing running behind us, and thought for sure we were dead.

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Then we righted our canoe and got into it as fast as humanly possible. We finally made it out to safety, sun-fried to a crisp, missing all of our valuables and most of our clothes, but never happier to be on shore. We packed up our bus, and left. As we were leaving, I rested my head on the window and saw a little cottage. I looked at it until the bus was about to pass it and saw a woman.

She looked back at me, and I could see her skin was torn and bleeding. After the bus passed, she vanished. Let me tell you of a sighting of the Jersey Devil. I was driving up Route 9 in Bayville at around pm. There were two cars in front of me and we were traveling about 35 mph. To the right of Route 9 is a mini-mall type building with woods behind it. To the right is all woods.